MSK Conditions

Busse, J., Alexander, P., Abdul-Razzak, A., Riva, J., Alabousi, M., Dufton, J. … You, J. (2013). Appropriateness of Spinal Imaging Use in Canada.  Canadian Institute for Health Research.

Article or Abstract Found:http://nationalpaincentre.mcmaster.ca/documents/AppropriatenessofSpinalImagingFinalReportApril252013.pdf

Key Finding(s): The authors of this Canadian Institutes of Health Research funded project performed a systematic review of spinal imaging use in Canada, surveyed Canadian spine surgeons, and examined provincial utilization data. Among other things, the authors found that “Most Canadian spine surgeons (84%) require imaging studies to accompany all spine related referrals” as well as that “From 2001-2011, MRI spine utilization has increased markedly, but this has not reduced the use of spine x-ray or CT spine, and spine x-rays still currently account for nearly half (40%) of all spine imaging costs.”

Roberts, M., Mapel, D., Hartry, A., Von Worley, A., & Thomson, H. (2013). Chronic pain and pain medication use in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Annals of the American Thoracic Society, 10(4), 290-298.

Article or Abstract Foundhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23952846

Key Finding(s): The authors note that while pain is a common problem for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) it is not widely discussed in COPD management guidelines. In this cross sectional study comparing incidence of pain among COPD patients compared with patients suffering from other chronic diseases, the study finds that approximately 60% of COPD patients experience chronic pain of some description and 36% experience mechanical/compressive back pain specifically.

You, J., Bederman, S., Symons, S., Bell, C., Yun, L., Laupacis, A., & Rampersaud, Y. (2013). Patterns of care after magnetic resonance imaging of the spine in primary care. Spine, 38(1), 51-59.

Article or Abstract Foundhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22652596

Key Finding(s): Reviewing records from an audit of outpatient MRI scans of the spice in Ontario and linking them to administrative databases, this study sought to better understand the relationship between MRI findings and the care subsequently provided to patients. They study concluded that “Patients receiving MRI scans of the spine in the primary care setting are frequently referred for surgical assessment and most do not receive subsequent surgery. MRI scan results do not discriminate very well between those who will and will not undergo surgery, suggesting that alternative models for the assessment of patients with spinal complaints in primary care should be explored, particularly in jurisdictions with long wait times for elective spinal surgery consultation.”

Vos, T., Flaxman, A., Naghavi, M., Lozano, R., Michaud, C., Ezzati, M.… Murray, C. (2012). Years lived with disability (ylds) for 1160 sequelae of 289 diseases and injuries 1990—2010: A systematic analysis for the global burden of disease study 2010. The Lancet, 380(9859), 2163 – 2196.

Article or Abstract Found: http://download.thelancet.com/pdfs/journals/lancet/PIIS0140673612617292.pdf?id=caa1KW_yyiITlcvNFZCqu

Key Finding(s): In this study funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, researchers sought to understand the various contributors to years lived with diseases (YLDs) across the world. The study concludes: “The main contributors to global YLDs were mental and behavioural disorders, musculoskeletal disorders, and diabetes or endocrine diseases. The leading specific causes of YLDs were much the same in 2010 as they were in 1990: low back pain, major depressive disorder, iron-deficiency anaemia, neck pain, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, anxiety disorders, migraine, diabetes, and falls.”

Public Health Agency of Canada. (2011). You can prevent falls!

Article or Abstract Foundhttp://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/seniors-aines/publications/public/injury-blessure/prevent-eviter/

Key Finding(s): In this public education resource developed by the Public Health Agency of Canada, they identify that “1 in 3 seniors will experience a fall each year, and half of those more than once.”

Bombardier, C., Hawker, G., & Mosher, D. (2011). The impact of arthritis in Canada: Today and over the next 30 years. Arthritis Alliance of Canada.

Article or Abstract Foundhttp://www.arthritisalliance.ca/en/impactquick

Key Finding(s): The Arthritis Alliance’s 2011 report looks at the impact of arthritis and how this impact is expected to grow over the next 30 years. The Alliance reports that “in 2010, approximately 49% of seniors over the age of 70 years are expected to be living with symptomatic OA. By 2040, this number is expected to increase to 71%.”

Shiri, R., Karppinen, J., Leino-Arjas, P., Soloviena, S., & Viikari-Juntura, E. (2009). The association between obesity and low back pain: A meta-analysis. American Journal of Epidemiology, 171(2), 135-154.

Article or Abstract Foundhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20007994

Key Finding(s): In this meta-analysis examining the correlation between overweight/obesity and low back pain, the authors concluded that: “Findings indicate that overweight and obesity increase the risk of low back pain. Overweight and obesity have the strongest association with seeking care for low back pain and chronic low back pain.”

Sinclair, A., Conroy, S., & Bayer, A. (2008). Impact of diabetes on physical function in older people. Diabetes Care, 31(2), 233-235.

Article or Abstract Foundhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18024850

Key Finding(s): In an effort to “explore the nature of functional impairment in older people with diabetes”, the authors found that among individuals over the age of 65 with diabetes, 46% were found to have mobility limitations, requiring some sort of mobility aid.

Iron, K., Jaakkimainen, L., Rothwell , D., Li, P., & Laupacis , A. (2004). Investigation of acute lower back pain in Ontario: Are guidelines being followed? Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences.

Article or Abstract Foundhttp://www.ices.on.ca/Publications/Atlases-and-Reports/2004/Investigation-of-acute-lower-back-pain-in-Ontario.aspx

Key Finding(s): In this report commissioned by Ontario’s Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care, the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES) studied the utilization of plain X-rays of the lumbar spine, and CT and MRI of the spine in Ontario between 1992 and 2001. They found that, over this ten year period, “the rate of CT scan and MRI use for LBP increased, along with a substantial increase in costs.”

Piney, S., & Regan, W. (2001). Educating medical students about musculoskeletal problems. Are community needs reflected in the curricula of Canadian medical schools? Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, 83-A(9), 1317-1320.

Article or Abstract Foundhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11568192

Key Finding(s): In this study which aims to both understand the extent to which Canadian medical schools cover musculoskeletal education as well as determine the prevalence of disorders related to the MSK system among patients presenting to their primary care physicians in North America, the authors found that “medical schools in Canada devoted 2.26% (range, 0.61% to 4.81%) of their curriculum time to musculoskeletal education” and that “between 13.7% and 27.8% of North American patients presenting to a primary care physician have a chief symptom that is directly related to the musculoskeletal system.”